reviews

"He keeps enough of the instrument's essential sound up front to make you aware of the musical and conceptual ground that he covers each time he splits a luau-worthy tone into a bouquet of blooming loops or lets it unspool into a puddle of tape."
[Bill Meyer, Dusted Magazine, 22.03.16]
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[Jason Kennedy, Hi Fi +, Issue 126, August '15]
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"Radiantly beautiful acoustic guitar music of the adventurous variety."
[Jason Kennedy, @EditorTheEar, 23.06.15]

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[Rob Turner, The Wire, Issue 374, April '15]
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"This is a guitar lover’s album. An opportunity to experience the possibilities of guitar music, freed from genres and allowed to exist as a wild animal of its own accord...All in all it’s remarkable progressive music contained in a remarkable package. It’s that simple."
[Bob Baker Fish, Cyclic Defrost, 27.02.15]
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"Notable is the superb quality of the recording! Crystal clear and very well balanced, like sitting next to him or better inside his instrument! The microtonality of every scratch and plug of the strings is reproduced in its full spectrum."
[www.dyingforbadmusic.com, 03.03.15]
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"Another great record...is The Humming Of Wires where he's exploring the Dobro guitar and putting this iconic instrument of the blues era into the context of early electronic inventions like the Theremin."
[www.dyingforbadmusic.com, 03.03.15]


"Rainier’s soulful performance of these little-known works by Partch is the most engaging and seamless combination of research and performance I have ever witnessed on a concert stage." 
[Matthew Lorenzon, Partial Durations / RealTime, 23.12.13]
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String Theory is an incredibly impressive monolith of a compilation. At almost three hours in length, it possibly won’t be listened to in its entirety regularly, but each of the two discs have the power to worm their way deep into the subconscious and stay there. Built on minimal, slow moving drones, the majority of these guitar based instrumentals have a weight and assuredness to them which are mesmerising. On the first of the two discs, the guitars are generally simple to discern, utilising more or less traditional tones and playing techniques, though pushing the mood to extremes of warm, enveloping atmosphere. Chris Rainier begins with one of the least drone-based pieces in ‘You’re A Distant Voice On The Radio’, sounding like Serge Leone and a slide guitar learning the joys of subtle digital signal processing."
[Adrian Elmer, Cyclic Defrost]